Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I)

CBT for Insomnia has been shown to be a very effective treatment for insomnia and consists of several different components. Treatment starts with an initial assessment to identify possible factors contributing to insomnia which often includes a sleep diary. After a full assessment, we will make a treatment plan together to help you attain your goals, which may include longer sleep, more restorative sleep, waking up less frequently, and feeling more rested during the day.
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What is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy?

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (often pronounced ACT in the psychology world) is a cognitive-behavioral treatment based on scientific research about how the human mind works. The name of this therapy comes from a primary theme: learning how to accept those experiences that are out of your control and committing to changing what you can to make your life better. As the name suggests, this is a very active treatment.
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Strategies to Ease the Day: Mini-relaxations

One of the most common things I hear from people when we are talking about reducing stress is (something like): “Meditation and relaxation might be great, but I don’t have time to do that during the day.” Work is too busy, or you have no privacy, or  you are with the kids all day.  I get it. But building mindfulness and relaxation into your life can be done with tiny moments of practice. They are
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Trouble Sleeping? Mindfulness May Help

A recent article in Time.com interviews Dr. David S Black about why mindfulness may be one of the best (and easiest) ways to get better sleep. Black is a researcher at the University of Southern California and the Founding Director of the American Mindfulness Research Association (AMRA). In the article, Black discusses his recent study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. The study examined the effectiveness of two sleep interventions with men and women who
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Practicing Gratitude in the New Year

Many of us are in the habit of making New Year’s resolutions. It feels good — there is a sense of optimism or even relief when thinking about how we are going to make our lives better. However, research suggests that these resolutions — even the most heartfelt ones — rarely lead to long-lasting changes in our behavior. Diets don’t stick and gym memberships go unused. By February the resolution may be totally forgotten, and
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